Neighbors meet to discuss downtown Franklin homeowner’s proposal to split up his property


Neighbors meet to discuss downtown Franklin homeowner’s proposal to split up his property

By BROOKE WANSER

A small group turned up to city hall on Wednesday evening as a discussion of splitting up a downtown residential property to add another home took place.

The homeowners of 120 Lewisburg Pike, Reid Anderson and his wife, Cameron McBride, want to split their half-acre property in two, selling that lot to make room for another house in what is now their backyard.

Anderson, a real estate agent, said he purchased the house in November of 2016, and was involved with the television series House Hunters Renovation as they renovated the property over a six-month period.

The proposed new single-family home with an attached garage would be accessed by Evans Street, a residential street between Columbia Avenue and Lewisburg Pike.

The property, as seen from Evans St. facing Lewisburg Pike/ Photo by Brooke Wanser

Concerns about drainage issues took the forefront at the meeting; since the property is in the middle of a major drainage easement, the solution to hold runoff water is to create a rain garden, which includes a small pond.

Neighbors chimed in their concern the rain garden would not suffice to hold all the water during heavy rains. Other neighbors offered to allow detention ponds for runoff to be constructed on their properties.

Beegie Adair, the homeowner next door at 122 Lewisburg Pike expressed concern that the rain garden would attract mosquitoes.

“We have a massive mosquito problem in that part of town,” she said during the meeting.

“I just want the water issue to be thoroughly taken care of,” Anderson said of the property, noting that flooding does not currently present an issue on his property during heavy rains.

“We’ve got a good engineering firm, and hopefully by building this house, we’re going to make it better,” he said.

Anderson said in discussions with the historic zoning commission, “everybody is on board,” though the commission still must approve the project.

Adair, a well-known jazz pianist, has lived in her home, which was constructed in 1923, since 1981.

“I think everybody has concerns when they have old property,” she said. “I don’t see anything I can worry about right now.”

Adair was concerned the proposed development would impact the trees on the border of her property and Anderson’s property. However, she seemed satisfied when she was reassured the trees would remain intact.

“I just like to be vigilant, in case somebody says one thing and does another,” Adair continued. “We’re running out of buildable property in Franklin, so it’s sort of like the wolf at the door.”

Brooke Wanser is the associate editor for the Franklin Home Page, and can be reached at brooke.wanser@homepagemediagroup.com. Follow her on Twitter at @BWanser_writes or @FranklinHomepg.

About The Author

Brooke Wanser is the associate editor for the Franklin Home Page, and can be reached at brooke.wanser@homepagemediagroup.com. Follow her on Twitter at @BWanser_writes or @FranklinHomepg.

Related posts

Leave a Reply