McCall says she wants long-term transit solutions for Williamson


McCall says she wants long-term transit solutions for Williamson

Home Page staff report

Holly McCall, candidate for State House District 65, is calling on Williamson County’s legislators to take a leadership role in planning for long-term transit solutions.

Holly McCall, candidate for State House District 65, is calling on Williamson County’s legislators to take a leadership role in planning for long-term transit solutions.

McCall’s appeal comes after the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce released its report, called Moving Forward, which recommends a starting point for a future regional plan.

“As the most affluent county in the state, and as one of the biggest contributors to regional traffic congestion, the Williamson County legislative delegation should be a leader and a partner in the planning process for a regional transit solution,” said McCall. “Unfortunately, our county’s legislative delegation has been silent at best, and in some cases have supported measures that hinder the Metro Planning Organization’s efforts and threaten funding sources.”

As highlighted in the chamber’s report, business growth and preservation are critical reasons for the need of a regional transit system. According to Franklin Tomorrow’s Cool Springs Multi-modal Study, jobs per square acre in Williamson County are projected to nearly double by 2040. Growing the number of jobs, however, significantly depends on a successful regional transit system.

“As someone who’s worked for MTA and on other large infrastructure projects, I understand the scope of building and funding a regional transit system,” McCall said. “We’re already a decade behind the curve, and in order to get a system in place that allows us to continue job growth and tourism our legislators must act now.”

The chamber’s Moving Forward report cites 10 recommendations for 2016, including a long-term plan for regional transit through MTA/RTA that comprises high-capacity transit service, such as rail, between Nashville and the cities of Clarksville, Franklin/Spring Hill, Gallatin, Lebanon and Murfreesboro.

“I talk to voters in Williamson County on a daily basis and the top concern they have is transit and infrastructure,” said McCall. “We desperately need leaders who will listen to constituents and work with MTA, RTA, the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce, Williamson, Inc., and other regional officials to get moving on a long-term solution.”

About The Author

Kelly Gilfillan is the owner-publisher of Home Page Media Group which has been publishing hyperlocal news since 2009.

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